What is the Best Outcome for the Boris Diaw Fiasco?


I gotta say, that's some solid defense. Credit: Jim O US Presswire

Boris Diaw wants out, his coach wants him out, the fans have wanted him out and pretty much, one way or another, he’s not going to be a Charlotte Bobcat for much longer.  He’s been deactivated from the roster.  Paul Silas ripped him a new one in the press, and everyone is buzzing about it.  The “Boris Diaw trade rumors” search is the #1 thing bringing people to the site and we haven’t really even talked about it.  But, seriously, how will this end? Option “A,” which sucks, the dumbest option, is a buyout.  The Bobcats pay whatever Diaw and his agent agree to, just to make him go away.  Diaw would go on to some other team, free and clear.  That’s the least likely scenario.  The Bobcats are in the business of gathering assets and while Boris is litterally a huge ASSet, he’s not much on the basketball court right now but he still counts as an asset.  Rich Cho and Rod Higgins aren’t going to let him go for nothing.

Option “B,” of course, is trading him.  There are some rumors, discussions leaking out that the Bobcats could be involved in a 3 way trade or some other fashion of trade that would bring something for the flabby Frenchman.  I don’t know if anything legitimately could be done.  I don’t know what sort of value Boris has on the open market.  He’s versatile, and when he wants to, he plays well in spurts.  But is he actually sought after by any team?  I doubt the Bobcats have fielded very many phone calls, other than “Hey, I’ll give you a 2nd rounder for Diaw,” that would legitimize his vaule on the market, even with his very public demands. I don’t know what team he’d work on.  His issue is, rather than filling roles, he handles about anything.  He doesn’t do one thing exceptionally well, but he does enough well that he’s not a complete loss on a roster.  Fellow FanSided blogger Quixem Ramirez at Air Alamo begs the question “Does Diaw fit on the Spurs?”  I’d venture a guess to say that that might be one of the best fits.  A strong, savvy coach, veteran leaders mixed with youth, a team that comes in waves, where Boris could blend in and of course, the all important French connection with Tony Parker in place.  But from the Bobcats’ side, what would they get back?  Quixem doesn’t mention that.  I am not good at the trade machine on ESPN.com, and at first look, the Spurs don’t have much to trade this way, Boris is afterall making $9 million.  Therein lies the problem, Diaw is making too much for far too little.

Option “C” is to stand pat and do nothing.  Let this thing play out.  Sit Boris for as long as you want to, it makes no difference except to his future earnings, which the Bobcats will have no part in anyway.  The buyout might save money, the trade might yield some sort of good return but the easiest, most likely option, is to do nothing.  Let Diaw sit, get fat on the bench, Keyshawn him if you want.  I think letting him rot might make the biggest point.  It’s the least risky, that’s for sure. I just don’t see any real value and I guess, it wouldn’t make much sense if I were GM of some other team to take on a petulant, likely overweight, shapeless goo-ball that doesn’t fill a distinct need on any sort of consistent basis.

The logic isn’t there. But, in the NBA, logic doesn’t always win out, or even factor in, sometimes.  One way or another, Boris Diaw isn’t contributing and he’s asked for some sort of “out.”  It just pisses me off that he thinks he can get what he wants after giving so little.

Tags: Bobcats Boris Diaw Featured Popular

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Andrew, this article is terrible.  The false conclusion you came to inevitably shows you didn’t think this out too well.Or maybe you were on a deadline, thereby thoughtful analysis was waylaid in favor of inferior product.  Ah, where to begin…Boris Diaw will not be traded unless the Bobcats are facilitating it on behalf of another team — long shot of long shots.  Since the Bobcats are in cap-hording, cost-cutting mode — pretty much since Jordan took the helm of this franchise — the net value, picks or cash is going to be minimal.  They’re not taking back another contract.  In other words, not a move that will help the Bobcats this year or anytime in the near future.  That leaves two options, but actually one, realistically: buyout or your genius strategy — nothing.   Let me tell you why the latter, makes zero sense.  Yes, Boris Diaw is overpaid.  But there will be more than half a dozen playoff suitors, the Spurs included, lined up for his services.  Human beings are fickle creatures.  They often constantly need their motivations modified/energized in order to perform the duties expected of them.Whether it be in work or marriage or pretty much any endeavor that requires long-term commitment.  Let me tell you, the Bobcats are an awful basketball team.  The worst in the league.  Not just the worst team this year… surprising wins aside, this might be the worst NBA team of the last five years.  Very hard for a player, no matter how sturdy psychologically, to endure that type of situation.  Losing can become a culture that sometimes needs miracles to unravel; the Clippers needed Blake Griffin — who looked like another Clipper woe story out of the gate when he missed his rookie year — and a deus ex machina in the form of rescinded Lakers trade to pull them out of that vortex.   This is where the Bobcats are now.  A very depressing situation and accordingly, a taxing mental toll on the players there, Boris Diaw included.  Takes a rare, machine-like player not to be affected by all that losing, infighting with the coach.  But even then Diaw is an enigma.  Diaw, until Silas benched him, played in 384 consecutive games.  That means, losing, fat, hurt, rain, shine, Diaw showed up to work ready to play.  He’d still be playing if Silas wasn’t publicly benching him –And therein lies his value.  Playoff teams know his value, know that more than anything, he just needs a change of venue.  Diaw on the Spurs, Lakers, Dallas is a fantastic role player — immediately elevates your bench because of his wide variety of skills.     But no one is going to trade for Diaw at that salary and the Bobcats aren’t taking back that salary. No, he will be bought out, because it’s THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  The Bobcats will save money because Diaw will take less to leave; his agent Doug Neustadt will pick up the money on Diaw’s new, remaining contract.  It’s a win-win.   Now imagine how upset Diaw and Neustadt will be if Bobcat management do what you propose…Hang on to him, not play him, keep him on the sidelines against his and his agent’s wishes.  Talk about damaging yourself for the future. In case you weren’t already aware, players’ agents pretty much run things behind-the-scenes…And even with all that ‘cap space’ in a small market, Jordan’s rep took a hit with them during the lockout for his stringent economics.  Why would Bobcat management want to then piss of Diaw’s agent, who will then likely badmouth the Bobcats to any/all of his future clients?Not just his own clients, but other agents and their clients?Makes no sense…I sincerely doubt that a rising GM like Cho is that short-sighted; he understands the big picture. Letting Diaw go in a buyout is essentially a PR move that shows the willingness of the Bobcats management to work with a player who has falleninto a bad situation; it also saves them money, eliminates a storyline, allows Silas to coach his youth, etcetera, etcetera.  Why, Andrew, is that a bad thing?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • andrewbarraclough

    Did I have a conclusion?  I havent read your whole comment because honestly it looks like a wall of words.  You think my article is terrible, but somehow you took the time to spew out your take on it?  Thanks?  Not to sound too defensive, but do you blog?  Do you follow the Bobcats closely?  If you don’t blog, would you like to?  If you could clean up your style, we could use you.  
     
    My defensiveness is from the perspective of a guy with a full time job, following a horrible team, with no real idea of how to communicate that.  I started this post one night falling asleep, started up my computer (2 days later) to see it unfinished and I finished it.  That’s full disclosure, and I’m not whining, just letting you know, a concerned and critical reader, what the deal is.  
     
    So, yeah, Diaw is playing again.  Not sure why but he is.  Tyrus Thomas is starting again, and I don’t know why on that one either.  
     
    So, Gregory Navarro, where can we read your terrible articles?

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • MustachioGato

     @Gregory D Navarro  I would agree that the original article may be a bit sloppy, but Greg your argument is about 3x worse. 
     
    You say that Diaw is impossible to trade due to his contract, but also that his contract buy out would be a massive help to the Bobcats in saving money (it wont) .  That sir doesn’t stand up.   If it helps the Bobcats it would help any team.  Diaw is on the last year of his contract, so his 9 mil would be an excellent way for some other teams to shed a couple contacts in exchange for a draft pick.  
     
    Major media is already reporting that the Nets are interested in Diaw and his expiring contract, in exchange for a first round pick (owned by the Nets from Houston) Johan Petro and Jordan Farmar.   Petro and Farmar both have 1 year left on their contracts and would work in a straight salary trade.  
     
    This allows the Nets to free up some cap space immediately (something the Bobcats aren’t concerned with at this point in the rebuild) and doesn’t cap strap the Bobcats past 1 year.   Nets get 9 million to spend in free agency immediately and the Bobcats get a draft pick and serviceable back up players in the mean time.  Diaw gets out of Charlotte, and is probably bought out by NJ.   Win:Win:Win
     
    A trade is clearly the best option.  I’m not sure if you are Boris Diaw, his agent or maybe a friend of either of them… but you’re solution to the problem only serves one party.  And when that party effectively quits on his team in mid-season… letting him rot on the bench makes more sense than caving into his ransom demands.
     

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

     admit my response became a wall of words, and for that, my condolences.  I read this article over lunch and it poured out of me in waves, so that the moment I got back to the keys, I just churned it.  I realized it was lengthy, but then again, sometimes the elements demand breadth over brevity.  I’m sorry you didn’t take the time to read it — I read your entry a couple of time and the responses as well.  I suppose it came off as an attack on blog/blogging skills and it shouldn’t have been.  The fault I found was with your conclusion to the Diaw situation.  Simple as that.  Now, where to begin…Nowhere in my post did I state that the Bobcats would save a ‘massive’ amount of money.  As a matter-of-fact, they’ll save only ‘a little’ money, maybe break even at that.  The equity in the transaction, strictly in the business sense,  which I’ll admit is somewhat hard to quantify at the moment, is for ‘future negotiations’between Bobcats management, players and their reps.  A guy like Neustadt runs a boutique firm, but in any case, it’s important that Bobcatsmanagement maintain good faith with the reps for future players repped by Neustadt and others. Diaw’s obviously never coming back, but why risk upsetting reps who hold grudges worse than Arthurian knights?I’m sure you saw this quote bandied about during the lockout –“I don’t want any of my clients playing for Michael Jordan, Paul Allen, Robert Sarver, Dan Gilbert or Peter Holt,” said one agent. “We won’t sign with them, unless they’re willing to really overpay. That’s going to be the only way these hardline owners are going to land any free agents after the way they’ve handled these negotiations.”http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2011/11/angry-agents-proving-the-point-for-hardline-owners/No need to exacerbate and already volatile situation on the business front.  As for the rumors…Diaw to Nets for Farmar+Petro+1st.  While that works out in favor of the Bobcats, I’ll believe it when I see it.  Even then, it falls under the umbrella of ‘facilitating a trade for another team’ as I mentioned in my post above.  This Dwight Howard fiasco is going down to the wire; I don’t see the Nets doing the Cats trade unless they’re absolutely all in to get Howard– and more importantly, the Magic are selling — forcing the Nets to hoard/extract assets.  As it is currently constituted, I don’t think it’ll happen. You see salary dumps all the time — but teams exchanging expiring salary?  Not really. Oh, what about that first round pick you ask?   That pick will likely be top-14 protected for 5-7 years, so in the immediate short term, considering the caliber of Petro and Farmar, still a salary dump.Farmar and Petro are mediocre at best; don’t help the Cats this year or in any other.  The only reason Diaw was activated at all yesterday was due to Najera’s sore knee; I don’t believe Silas has softened his stance.  Diaw will be bought — most likely by the Cats and it’ll be better for everybody.  But yeah, I concur with you that it’s immensely frustrating situation — not just Diaw, but the Bobcats.  They find so many ways to lose, to not try, guys like Ty Thomas make you wanna kick the crap out of furniture. Amazingly though, this upcoming draft is STACKED.  At least 3-4 solid impact players – Not even Michael Jordan can screw this draft up, especially with Rich Cho at the helm.  Hopefully, a light at the end of the tunnel.     A light named Anthony Davis…  

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding… 

  • Gregory D Navarro

    Mea culpa — Farmar has a player option for next year, so he might be coerced into staying, but he’s actually having a decent season on a bad team.  With teams out there needing point guards and the Cats set with D.J., there’s a real chance he’s only in Char for the remainder of the season.
     
    Petro’s under contract for next year, so that likely keeps him in the fold, but with a per of 8.93, Petro barely qualifies as an NBA role player.  So unless they can convince Farmar to stay, it could be fool’s gold.  
     
    Uptick scenario is they hold on to both into next year and they become valuable expiring contracts — at almost 7 million or so, to net them a good player.  If they amnesty Ty Thomas, they could have some real leverage rebuilding…